Ohio University ImPRessions

Ohio University ImPRessions

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How to Make a Media List Without Cision

July 14, 2014

By: Marisa Fiore @MarisaFiore1

So you have already made a media list that identifies the campaign’s objective and the audience you want to reach. What’s next? Here are three ways to enhance your media list without using Cision.

  1. Research beginning with the end. What do you want your end goal to be? Decide what the steps you need to take to meet your goal. Once you have figured out where/how you want the message shared, go after the outlets that will get you to that exact goal.
  1. Use social media. Most journalists have Twitter accounts these days, and they usually have Twitter lists of their colleagues. Just do some digging to find new reporters. Once you have found new reporters, Google them and read their stories. Don’t forget to research reporters that have covered your beat in the past too!
  1. Collect the right information and refine. Make sure you are getting the correct contact information. Don’t forget to include how the journalist prefers to be contacted whether it is by phone or by email. What materials do they usually need (photos/videos)? When is the best time to connect with them? What is the best story angle for your pitch? Make sure you only have one reporter for each type of publication, to ensure you don’t have any duplicates.
  1. Quality over quantity. It is more effective to have a small list of folks you have a relationship with vs. a large list of people you randomly send information to. Build up a relationship before you actually need them.
  1. Consider new media groups. Sometimes when we think of our audience, we think of just one kind of person. However, sometimes our audience includes a whole new group of people. For example, I did a project on coffee addicts and my research showed that there was a growing number of Hispanics that were drinking more than two cups of coffee today. It is important to be aware of these trends so that you can tap into different ethnic and local media groups.

No matter which way you decide to go, make sure you have done your homework. Research is the most important part of any successful campaign. As Albert Einstein said, “If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?” If we already had the perfect media list we wouldn’t be building and enhancing one! Remember nothing is ever perfect and there is always room for improvement!

 

Should I ask about salary during job interviews?

May 29, 2014 3 Comments

By: Kelsey Miller @Kelsey_65

SalaryThe dreaded question of when to bring up the topic of compensation for work during the job interview is always a challenge. To cut to the chase, DON’T DO IT. There is a proper time and place in which to talk money, and during the job interview is not the place. The reason for this is simple: why should someone bring up salaries when he or she hasn’t gotten the job yet?

Think of an interview as a first date – it’s all about timing. You don’t want to freak your date out by trying to go straight for the kiss before you actually go out on the date. Talking money too soon with a possible employer can be quite the turn off and make them think twice about giving you the job.

Although it’s frowned upon to ask about money during the interview, it’s still a necessary conversation to have. Not only is it necessary, it is also very important, especially for women.  Salaries should be dealt with once you know you have received the job. The employer may bring it up first, but there is nothing wrong with bringing it up first.

It is very important to do your research before you interview for the position. Research the average wage for the kind of work you will be doing and the region of your place of employment. Due to the gender wage gap, women may experience employers that may try to offer wages that are less than their male counterparts. Go to http://www.payscale.com/cost-of-living-calculator to figure out the median salary for the work that you will be doing in the city you are working in to feel confident in your research and to stand your ground when discussing compensation. Most employers expect new employees to be grateful for receiving the job that they won’t question how much they are paid, but when you stand up for yourself, it shows that you take initiative and are strong willed. This may be interpreted to the employer that you will do the same for his or her company. Many employers will respect you for pushing the limit. If the employer isn’t flexible for no apparent reason, maybe you should rethink him or her as being someone you really want to work with.

Aside from research, you need to think about how flexible you are willing to be. If this position has been your dream job since you were in 1st grade, you may find yourself being a lot more flexible than for a position that you just stumbled upon online about a week ago. Whatever your flexibility, be sure to stick to your guns.

Put a price on your qualifications and potential and don’t lower it for any one job. The worst-case scenario is always going to be that they just say “no”. It isn’t the end of the world, and you won’t have to ask yourself “what if…?”. It is obvious you were the best fit for the position; they need you about as much as you need them.

 

Lessons From a Father

June 4, 2013

Those who know me are well aware of my passion for my family business and the immeasurable respect I have for my father. With a deep rooted love for baseball in my family, it’s no surprise the quote that best illustrates my father is from the classic movie The Sandlot. “People say he’s less than a God, but more than a man. Like Hercules or something..”  I will start with some brief background information to help you understand why I value my father’s lessons so highly.

Historyimage001
In 1969, my grandfather Art Sr. founded A.M. Yerecic Co. that was to become the tradition now known as Yerecic Label. At the time, my father was a young teen working as Yerecic Label’s first press operator in the garage of their family home. Together, the two generations were determined to work hard and expand the business.

Today, Yerecic Label is established as the leading label manufacturer in North America for the perishables industry image002with a state of the art printing facility in New Kensington, PA. The Yerecic Label legacy has called to the third generation as my three brothers and I take positions within the company.

As I continue my career at Yerecic Label, I’ve found that the skills used to run your own business translate directly to many aspects of the public relations profession. While our major might be located in the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, strategic communication is a vital part of all business relations.  Below I have compiled five of the most important lessons from my father that I apply to my work every day:

KNOW YOUR MARKET
Yerecic Label is different from the competition by investing in research to construct products that understand consumer preferences. This focus on research is vital for any piece of work you create. According to Farkas’ JOUR3700 class, more than 30 percent of your work time should be spent on research. To create a thriving product, you need be able to accurately convey the benefits and get all the facts.

DIRFT
Check, double check and check again. At Yerecic Label, the motto of DIRFT or DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME is used to promote increased attention to all projects. This increased focus helps preserve costs, build relationships and create reliability. Whether it’s a promotional poster or a press release, be diligent in your procedures and proofing to avoid embarrassing flops.

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS
Partnerships with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the National Pork Board, the Produce Marketing Association and other countless organizations help to provide strong relationships for Yerecic Label to grow and learn. Take advantage of people and organizations that help expand your horizons. A great example of this within the ImPRessions organization is the 2012-2013 Athens County Humane Society account ran by Kate McFadden. The account reached out to countless local Athens businesses and individuals to make the spring Woof and Wine fundraiser a huge success.

 

HARD WORK CREATES LUCK
My family will be the first to tell you that starting and even more importantly, maintaining a business, does not come from pure luck. My father’s favorite quote is: “I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it,” by Thomas Jefferson. This quote provides the best lesson my father consistently pushes, there is no replacement for true hard work and dedication. Remember, your success is measured by how hard you are willing to work for it.

FIND YOUR PASSION
As silly as it may sound, labels are my family’s passion. We affectionately call the Yerecic Label office “Label Land” and many conversations revolve around industry topics. Passion is what provides drive and motivation, and without it all your hard work seems empty.  Find your passion because loving what you do is half of the battle to excelling in your work.


-Kristin Yerecic is a senior studying public relations with minors in Business and Economics. Follow her at @yerecick

Specialized Teams Ensuring Success

November 17, 2011

By: Annie Beard
Associate, ImPRessions Internal Account

The ImPRessions College Book Store account is getting creative on getting work done. They have come up with a new, easy way to be highly productive in a small amount of time. Want in on their secret?

They divide their account up into four separate groups that work on projects specific to their expertise. The four groups inside the CBS account are the design team, the writing team, the social media team, and the research team. They are all vital to the success of the account, and all work together in finishing projects.

Each team within the account has specific roles and jobs they must achieve.  For example, the design team creates flyers, ads, and posters promoting events or sales that the College Book Store has going on. They did a lot to promote their Homecoming Weekend event, “Homecoming for the Homeless.”

The writing team creates press releases including things such as sales increases, CBS’s involvement in the community, and other topics along those lines.

The social media team really focuses on the CBS account’s Twitter and Facebook pages. They have recently been working on increasing friends and followers on both of these social media sites.

The research team is working on market research. For example, what do students want from College Book Store? Or what would make it easier to rent/ buy from CBS?  Where else do students rent their books?

As you can see, breaking up into groups inside an account makes it easier to get more done. Alaina Martini, the CBS secretary said that, “We can accomplish many things at one time by delegating tasks to each group.”

They are all working towards the same goal of promoting their account, the College Book Store, while saving time. They use the weekly meetings to sit down and put all of their work together. Martini also said, “At the meetings all the groups fill each other in on what they have been doing. This is helpful because if someone on the writing team has a design idea, we can share it then.”

This is a technique that other accounts within ImPRessions could use, also. It is a genius way to keep your account ahead of the game, while learning everything you need to know about the PR world!

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