Ohio University ImPRessions

Ohio University ImPRessions

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Preparing for a Summer Internship (or Job) in a New City

April 14, 2014

Manhattan Office Vacancy Rate Drops In Second QuarterAs the school year is beginning to wind down and we’re preparing for the summer, you are probably thinking about the next steps with your upcoming internship in a new city. It’s exciting to explore a new city and discover more about yourself and how well you mesh with the city you are living in for the next three months. But with this move, you probably have a lot questions burning in your brain. Here are five tips that will ease your mind about the big move:

1. Where am I going to live?

There are a few ways you could seek out this answer: Start by asking co-workers, especially the hiring manager. They certainly know a thing or two about the best and safest places to look and with whom you can be put in contact. Also, check out nearby universities. For instance, if you have an internship in New York City, NYU has housing over the summer for interns coming in from out of state. If the city you’re moving to doesn’t have a university that rents out dorm rooms, check out the college student areas. Many students look to sublet over the summer! Don’t forget your smartphone. One app that I’ve recently discovered is called apartment list. It lets you search by zip code, bedrooms and price in order to narrow down what exactly you’ll need for the summer.

2.How am I going to pay for everything?

Budget, budget, budget. I don’t think I can stress that enough. Seriously though, when you’re moving to a new city that’s as expensive as Los Angeles or New York, expenses need to be at the forefront of your brain. Plan your budget ahead of time and think about what you’ll need to make it through the summer and stick to it!

3. I feel so alone! What should I do?

Don’t be afraid! Not knowing anyone, in my mind, is the most exciting part because you get a fresh start. You get to put the best version of yourself out there! Just because you aren’t in a dorm anymore with fresh, curious faces about this new world of college they’re about to face, doesn’t mean that you won’t make friends. It’s hard to be vulnerable, especially in a place where you don’t know anyone. Embrace your alone time, because pretty soon your phone won’t stop blowing up with people asking you to hang out.

4. How do I get around?

Take a couple days before you start your internship to navigate your way around the city. You DO NOT want to be late on your first day – mapping your way around your new surroundings will put you at ease and make you feel more comfortable about wherever are for the next three months.

5. I need to get out of the house, what can I do?

There many things you can do in this situation like ask your co-workers. They’ve lived in the city long enough to know some of the best hotspots in town and probably have some great insight into cool events that happen every summer! Your smartphone can once again come into play here, too. One app I love using is Fodor’s City Guides. The app lists off all of the important sights, restaurants, shopping, performing arts and nightlife that you should check out while you’re in town for the summer.

Ali Cupelli is a senior studying Strategic Communications. You can follow her on Twitter at @ali_cupelli.

Adjusting to the Windy City

June 12, 2013 1 Comment

ChicagoI have always pictured my life out of college in a big city with a modern apartment and glamorous job. After work I could grab dinner with my fellow colleagues at a swanky restaurant and on the weekends I would have endless streets to explore and shop. Chicago has always been my city of choice. When I decided to start looking for internships for this summer, Chicago was my first option. Luckily, and to my surprise, I was able to get connected with a non-profit organization and land a social media internship.

Once the excitement of my new summer plans faded, the reality of living in a new city began to sink in. How would I know where to go? How would I get around? What would I do in my spare time? I grew up in a suburb of Detroit that was about 15 minutes from Ann Arbor and was not used to having to walk places, let alone use public transportation. As my moving date to the city grew closer, I became more anxious and nervous about how I would adjust to living in a new city alone.

I made arrangements to live with my grandparents, who live in a suburb about 20 minutes from downtown Chicago when there isn’t any traffic. However, driving in and out of the city during rush hour could potentially take hours, so I decided public transportation would be the best option. My sister has lived in the city for the past seven years and made me a schedule of trains I could take and a map from the station to my building. After practicing the route before my first day and eventually commuting multiple times by train, I am more confident in getting around the area where I work.

I have now officially completed a full week of my internship and am still learning my way around downtown Chicago. I now know the difference between the Metra and CTA, I can hail my own cab and have mastered speed walking.

Getting adjusted to a new city can be intimidating at first, especially when moving from a suburb to a big city. Here are a few tips that can help when getting adjusted into a new city.

Plan ahead. This can apply to everything, whether it is practicing your transportation paths days before you start or even just getting to train or bus stops before they are scheduled to arrive.

Explore. Spend time just walking up and down new streets and going into stores or restaurants. The more familiar you are with an area the more comfortable and at home you will feel. This also helps to meet new people and learn of new places to go.

Social media. As PR stars we are used to depending on social media to post about what we are doing and getting responses, but in this case follow Twitter accounts where you’ll learn about events going on in the city. It’s easy to do the “touristy” things, but to really embrace the city culture, find out what people who live in the city are doing.

-Allison Rumsas is a junior strategic communications major with a Spanish minor. Follow her adventures through the Windy City at @allisonrumsas.

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