Ohio University ImPRessions

Ohio University ImPRessions

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Twitter Lessons from the A-List

December 2, 2013 2 Comments

As technology is evolving, so are the ethics of journalism. Part of the changing technology is the emerging presence and influence of social media. In 140 characters you can enhance or inhibit your professional career – so no pressure.

By having a presence on Twitter you are not only conveying your thoughts, ideas and work, but you’re building a brand that may be an employer’s first impression of you. And what better way to learn what to do, and not do, on Twitter than look at the people who arguably have the most influence on the Twitter community?

Here’s some lessons to take away from some of our favorite A-list celebrities.

Do show your personality. Oftentimes I will like, or dislike, a celebrity based on how funny and relatable I find their tweets. And yes, I do realize this may not be the best course of action.

Take Anna Kendrick for example. I saw her in Twilight and loved her in Pitch Perfect, but I never really thought twice about her until I found her Twitter, after which she instantly became one of my favorite celebrities.

Anna

Do promote your work. Promoting your work is important and now with the influence of the Internet, we have more power than ever before to set ourselves apart and promote our work.

Mindy

Do connect with others. By reaching out to a firm or company before meeting with them, you have a great opportunity to set an amazing first impression. By connecting with others you can also promote collaborations. Jimmy Fallon does this before his show each night.

Jimmy

Don’t get into Twitter feuds. This one’s for you Kanye. Getting into a fight with Jimmy Kimmel on Twitter…probably not the smartest idea. So if you’re having an issue with a friend, colleague or stranger, it might be best to not display your emotions on the Internet for everyone to see. A simple phone call or text message might suffice in this situation.

Kimmel

Don’t drunk tweet. We get it, you partied, maybe drank a little too much. That doesn’t mean you have to turn to Twitter every time you have a crazy night. There are some things that are better left off the Internet, and drunken tweets are one of them.

LIamDon’t tweet only promotional things. When people only tweet promotional things to advance their careers, I get bored. It’s always more fun to follow people who spice up their promotions with some personality or fun anecdote.

-Carolyn Nachman is a junior studying strategic communication. Follow her at @CarolynNachman.

How Shattering my iPhone Screen Taught me About PR

October 23, 2013 2 Comments

It finally happened.

Just a few weeks ago I was walking around without a care in the word. I was texting, taking pictures, checking my Twitter feed, acting like my iPhone 5 was an indestructible commodity. But then, with one small slip of the fingers and one little shatter of glass, my entire world changed.

Not to be dramatic, but shattering my nearly new iPhone 5 is definitely on the “Top 10 Bad Things That Happened To Me In 2013” list. My iPhone was my baby; the one special thing that I went to sleep with every night, and woke up to every morning. For a whilePhone, I even thought about giving it a name.

Although my shattered iPhone still works okay, I am forced to live with the ever-present reminder that things are just not how they used to be. It’s easy to be mad at Apple for not making its products stronger and sturdier, but looking back on the relationship with my iPhone, it’s easy to see that I was in the wrong.

So, here’s what I’ve learned from shattering my iPhone screen, and here’s how I’m going to carry these lessons with me into the professional, PR world:

1. Never sacrifice quality. When I shattered my iPhone, the only protection between it and the cold, hard, unforgiving ground was a thin, flimsy case that I had bought on Amazon for $1.25 the week before. Although the case was pretty and very cheap, I knew it did not offer even one percentage of the protection my old OtterBox Defender Series case did. However, after having had my iPhone for the past four months without incident, and especially after watching this YouTube video, I decided to sacrifice quality and go for what I thought was a cooler, more attractive upgrade.

And look where that got me. Lesson learned? Never sacrifice quality… oh, and don’t believe everything you see on YouTube. Who cares if my Otter Box case wasn’t the best-looking thing on the market? It did what a phone case is supposed to do – protect a phone – whereas my Amazon deal failed me.

So, how does this translate to PR? Basically, in every way. When you’re working with clients, never present them with cheap, slapdash work just because it’s easy to produce and superficially attractive. Instead, go for quality. Spend the extra time and money to really perfect a project; show your clients that you care about their success. In the end, when their investments have been proven worth it, clients will thank you for your quality service and they will form loyal, lasting relationships with your company.

2. When disaster strikes, pick up the broken pieces and make do with what remains. I broke my iPhone. I broke it, I broke it, I broke it. It sucks. However, no matter how many times I wish I had held a firmer grip, no matter how many times I let out a sigh of exasperation because I can barely read the time, the fact remains that I broke it, so now I have to make do with my mistake.

The first thing I did after I broke my phone was order a screen protector. Now, instead of resembling Bill Hader on that T-Mobile commercial, I can at least slide my fingers across my screen without drawing blood. Although this is a small accomplishment, it’s much better than no accomplishment at all.

Likewise, when you’re working in PR, it’s probable that disaster will strike at one point in your career. If – and when – that happens, you can’t take back the mistake, but you can learn to recover and move on. You might not be able to forget what happened, but at least you’ll no longer feel the lingering pain.

3. Always, always have insurance. (Or a Plan B). Thank GOODNESS I have insurance on my iPhone. Of all the life decisions I have ever made, buying insurance for my iPhone 5 was one of the smartest. If not for insurance, I would have to pay up to $900 for an entirely new phone. As it is, because of insurance, I will only have to pay $100. Still a lot of money for a broke college kid like me, but way less than it could have been.

For the purpose of this post, I will equate buying insurance to having a Plan B. If something fails – a client event, a pending press release or a media pitch – it’s always essential to have a backup plan. That way, when that previously-mentioned and inevitable disaster strikes, you won’t find yourself out on the streets, begging for charity and forgiveness.

(And, speaking of, it you are willing to contribute the Briagenn Adams’ shattered iPhone cause, feel free to tweet me, @Briagenn!)

-Briagenn is a junior studying strategic communication with a minor in French. Follow Bri at @Briagenn.

Lessons From a Father

June 4, 2013

Those who know me are well aware of my passion for my family business and the immeasurable respect I have for my father. With a deep rooted love for baseball in my family, it’s no surprise the quote that best illustrates my father is from the classic movie The Sandlot. “People say he’s less than a God, but more than a man. Like Hercules or something..”  I will start with some brief background information to help you understand why I value my father’s lessons so highly.

Historyimage001
In 1969, my grandfather Art Sr. founded A.M. Yerecic Co. that was to become the tradition now known as Yerecic Label. At the time, my father was a young teen working as Yerecic Label’s first press operator in the garage of their family home. Together, the two generations were determined to work hard and expand the business.

Today, Yerecic Label is established as the leading label manufacturer in North America for the perishables industry image002with a state of the art printing facility in New Kensington, PA. The Yerecic Label legacy has called to the third generation as my three brothers and I take positions within the company.

As I continue my career at Yerecic Label, I’ve found that the skills used to run your own business translate directly to many aspects of the public relations profession. While our major might be located in the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, strategic communication is a vital part of all business relations.  Below I have compiled five of the most important lessons from my father that I apply to my work every day:

KNOW YOUR MARKET
Yerecic Label is different from the competition by investing in research to construct products that understand consumer preferences. This focus on research is vital for any piece of work you create. According to Farkas’ JOUR3700 class, more than 30 percent of your work time should be spent on research. To create a thriving product, you need be able to accurately convey the benefits and get all the facts.

DIRFT
Check, double check and check again. At Yerecic Label, the motto of DIRFT or DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME is used to promote increased attention to all projects. This increased focus helps preserve costs, build relationships and create reliability. Whether it’s a promotional poster or a press release, be diligent in your procedures and proofing to avoid embarrassing flops.

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS
Partnerships with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the National Pork Board, the Produce Marketing Association and other countless organizations help to provide strong relationships for Yerecic Label to grow and learn. Take advantage of people and organizations that help expand your horizons. A great example of this within the ImPRessions organization is the 2012-2013 Athens County Humane Society account ran by Kate McFadden. The account reached out to countless local Athens businesses and individuals to make the spring Woof and Wine fundraiser a huge success.

 

HARD WORK CREATES LUCK
My family will be the first to tell you that starting and even more importantly, maintaining a business, does not come from pure luck. My father’s favorite quote is: “I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it,” by Thomas Jefferson. This quote provides the best lesson my father consistently pushes, there is no replacement for true hard work and dedication. Remember, your success is measured by how hard you are willing to work for it.

FIND YOUR PASSION
As silly as it may sound, labels are my family’s passion. We affectionately call the Yerecic Label office “Label Land” and many conversations revolve around industry topics. Passion is what provides drive and motivation, and without it all your hard work seems empty.  Find your passion because loving what you do is half of the battle to excelling in your work.


-Kristin Yerecic is a senior studying public relations with minors in Business and Economics. Follow her at @yerecick

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