Ohio University ImPRessions

Ohio University ImPRessions

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How to Make a Media List Without Cision

July 14, 2014

By: Marisa Fiore @MarisaFiore1

So you have already made a media list that identifies the campaign’s objective and the audience you want to reach. What’s next? Here are three ways to enhance your media list without using Cision.

  1. Research beginning with the end. What do you want your end goal to be? Decide what the steps you need to take to meet your goal. Once you have figured out where/how you want the message shared, go after the outlets that will get you to that exact goal.
  1. Use social media. Most journalists have Twitter accounts these days, and they usually have Twitter lists of their colleagues. Just do some digging to find new reporters. Once you have found new reporters, Google them and read their stories. Don’t forget to research reporters that have covered your beat in the past too!
  1. Collect the right information and refine. Make sure you are getting the correct contact information. Don’t forget to include how the journalist prefers to be contacted whether it is by phone or by email. What materials do they usually need (photos/videos)? When is the best time to connect with them? What is the best story angle for your pitch? Make sure you only have one reporter for each type of publication, to ensure you don’t have any duplicates.
  1. Quality over quantity. It is more effective to have a small list of folks you have a relationship with vs. a large list of people you randomly send information to. Build up a relationship before you actually need them.
  1. Consider new media groups. Sometimes when we think of our audience, we think of just one kind of person. However, sometimes our audience includes a whole new group of people. For example, I did a project on coffee addicts and my research showed that there was a growing number of Hispanics that were drinking more than two cups of coffee today. It is important to be aware of these trends so that you can tap into different ethnic and local media groups.

No matter which way you decide to go, make sure you have done your homework. Research is the most important part of any successful campaign. As Albert Einstein said, “If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?” If we already had the perfect media list we wouldn’t be building and enhancing one! Remember nothing is ever perfect and there is always room for improvement!

 

Are Bloggers really Journalists?

April 17, 2014

bloggingAddressing the issues of journalism and blogging can be quite tricky. The negative connotations lent to citizen journalism make it hard for bloggers to be taken seriously. However, many blogs are run by renowned journalists and apply the tools of the trade learned in journalism schools across the country. So to answer the question if bloggers are journalists: yes… and no. It all depends on your answer of what a journalist really is.

Why all bloggers are journalists

If a journalist is simply someone that writes, every blogger is a journalist. Blogs are written; therefore the bloggers that write them can carry the title of a journalist. If a journalist is someone that spreads news, every blogger is a journalist. News can mean many things to many different people, but what you write about will always matter to one person, making it news. Similar to newspaper and magazine articles, blogs vary widely in topics. Niche markets can also be very popular with both bloggers and print journalists, making even the smallest population of consumers happy.

Why all bloggers are not journalists

As I have previously stated, blogs are easy for anyone and a good starter tool. This includes people that are not well versed in the forms of AP Style, how to format a blog and grammar rules. This leads to blogs and citizen journalism having an unprofessional connotation. This assumption of unprofessional writing does not bode well with the professional journalists of the world. However, what is a journalist? If a journalist is someone that has taken classes and graduated from a journalism school, while having professional training, all bloggers are not journalists. The negative connotation that comes with citizen journalism has a lot to do with journalists in the sense that they went to a journalism school and worked hard for their degree – unlike some citizen journalists. The notion that citizen journalists can do the same work as a trained journalist is ridiculous to someone that has endured 4+ years of training for a career in Journalism.

Overall, it can be hard to distinguish whether a blogger is a journalist. When it comes down to it, just look at the writing and content presented. If you find it professional, it doesn’t really matter whether that person attended a journalism school. Above all, listen to your gut and don’t back down when discussing what you truly believe in. After all, your most important client is yourself.

Gentry Bennet is a freshman studying Strategic Communications. You can follow her on Twitter at @Gen_andTonic.

5 Challenges of Switching a Major into the Journalism School

August 21, 2013

ScrippsSwitching your major in college is one thing, but switching into the prestigious E.W. Scripps School of Journalism is another story.  Personally, I didn’t know what I wanted to major in coming into college, so I scanned through the majors offered at Ohio University as I was applying.  By the time I got my acceptance letter, I had forgotten what I even chose to major in.  As I’m going into my sophomore year, I’m about to apply to the J-School for spring semester.

I imagine many other students are in the same boat, and probably facing the same challenges as I am. Make sure to keep the following in mind before applying for the school.

1) Recommendation Letters One of the main challenges I’m facing with this process is finding people who can write recommendation letters about my journalistic abilities. Since I did just realize this year that I love writing, I only took two journalism classes.  One of which was a huge lecture hall, so there’s no way my professor would even know my name, let alone write me a letter recommending me. This upcoming semester, I’m taking two more journalism classes, so I’ll be looking to build a relationship with my professors in hope that they will be able to write me a recommendation letter.

2) Examples of journalism work Having just realized that I want to be a journalism major this past year, it’s been challenging to get professional samples of work to be able to submit with my application.  However, I did talk to a professor in Scripps, who suggested I join ImPRessions and PRSSA.  From there, I have learned so much already, and he also suggested that I join as many clubs that I can.

3) The Pressure I thought getting into college my freshman year was stressful, but now that I’m already enrolled at Ohio University, there’s so much pressure to get into the major I want because if I don’t, I might not graduate on time.  If denied acceptance into the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, it is required to wait a whole year to reapply.

4) Resume building Not having much experience in anything related to journalism makes it hard to have a perfect resume that makes you look like you know what you’re doing with your life.  Using InDesign to create your resume at least gives it a professional look.   Also, asking professors and other J-School students to critique your resume will help make it get that much closer to perfection.

5) Getting help It’s challenging having to ask for help because you don’t know what you’re doing.  Transferring your major to journalism is a difficult process, but asking for help is the only way you’ll make it.  Email professors, go talk to an adviser, anything helps to get you going in the right direction.

Applying for the J-School is a challenging process, but it will be worth it in the end.  I’m looking forward to saying that I’m officially part of the J-School.  I have met many wonderful people as I’m applying this upcoming semester.

-Meredith Broadwater is a sophomore studying media arts and studies but will be applying to the journalism school in the fall. Follow her at @Meredithbroad.

 

 

Should You Switch Journalism Tracks?

August 19, 2013 1 Comment

JournalismEntering my freshman year at Ohio University, I wanted to be a journalist. To me, being a journalist meant working for a newspaper or magazine in New York City and writing every day for the rest of my career. This seemed exciting, but little did I know that this was only the very beginning of where journalism could take me.

I’ve always enjoyed exploring and trying new things, so I signed up for plenty of clubs outside of print journalism. One of those clubs was PRSSA. At the beginning of the year, I didn’t really understand what public relations consisted of or how to build a career out of it, so I kept a close eye on the strategic communications track in order to learn more.

Everyone talked about ImPRessions and how it went hand in hand with PRSSA, so second semester I decided to sign up for ImPRessions as well. After getting hands on experience and getting a better look at what public relations really is, I knew this was the right track for me. It took a lot of exploring and open-mindedness to discover that this was my path, but I am so glad that I took the time to look outside of the box.

As you probably know, it is very common to change your major at some point during your college career. Going away for the first time allows you to take a better look at yourself and what you want out of life. My views changed drastically in just one year of college, and will most likely continue to grow and develop as I do. With that being said, it is important to stay open to career changes or developments.

You shouldn’t worry about changing your major or track so much that you stay put where you are, because at the end of the day, it is important to be happy and enjoy your career. I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I stuck with a major that was no longer the right fit for me because I was scared of what may happen.

If you’re unsure what you want to do or what path you want to take; explore. Take the time to look into different avenues and make sure you talk to people in each of them. I wouldn’t have signed up for ImPRessions or learned as much as I did about public relations if I didn’t talk to people in the strategic communications track. There is no better way to learn about something than by asking questions and finding out the facts. Never be afraid of what may happen if you change your mind and remember to just go for it! At the end of the day, you will be happy you did. I am so glad I took the chance to explore the strategic communications and take the leap to change.

-Jessica Carnprobst is a sophomore studying strategic communications. Follow Jessica at @Jess_Carnprobst.

A Bag Full of Tricks in Leipzig, Germany

August 5, 2013 1 Comment

KateThis summer I had the great opportunity to further my journalism education across the pond in Leipzig, Germany. Myself, along with thirteen other J-School classmates, traveled thousands of miles to gain a better perspective of international journalism at the University of Leipzig.

I have never had a burning passion to become an international journalist, but was curious how the other side of the world did this journalism thing. During my four weeks abroad, I explored Germany while writing articles, blogs and edited and broadcasted a radio piece. By the end of those four weeks, I gained an immense appreciation for international communicators and realized how important it was to have that skill set.

However, the tasks I completed abroad were tougher than I imagined. I had taken a step back from “traditional” journalism many moons ago when I found my home in public relations at OU. The world was not the same as back home in the United States. I found myself bored to death on trams and trains when no Wi-Fi was provided to check my Facebook or Twitter feeds.

It came as a shock to me when our group visited MDR, one of Germany’s new and innovative television channels that broadcasts to Saxony. A recent batch of interns were exploring the possibility of using social media to attract a younger audience. One intern took it upon herself to start up and run the social media for the company. One girl on her MacBook versus all of Central Germany; I get anxiety just thinking about it!

Because European media was not as tech savvy as I was used to, I had to re-hone my traditional journalism skills. Most of our class assignments were articles or radio pieces. As a result, my experience in Germany soon felt like a distant yet familiar dream as I dived back into the world of broadcast and feature writing.

After my first collaborative article I had shaken out most of the cobwebs and felt more comfortable writing my second article; a profile on an American female acrobatic performer who was currently performing at a local theater show. I stayed up all night perfecting the story before it was published and felt great sense of accomplishment. I hadn’t lost my old writing skills after all!

But how were these old tricks of mine going to help me improve my PR skill set? What was I getting out of this trip that I couldn’t get interning at an agency at home? Then I started to think like the savvy PR chick I am, and realized how important a solid background in news and feature writing was to the world of public relations.

I had spent so much time using social media to promote our client with ImPRessions last year that I forgot the beauty of PR is that we have so many mediums to work through to reach the public. The possibilities are endless, people! How interesting would it have been to post the acrobat story on a travel website or Facebook page to promote the show or entice traveling Americans to visit Leipzig to see the performance.

I think as college students, it’s easy for us to rely solely upon Twitter or Facebook as our PR tools because it’s easy in a college town. However, in the real world (as in the international world) you have to spread all of the pieces across the game board in order to pass go and collect 200 dollars.

What I learned studying international journalism abroad was that by taking the initiative to develop a wide range of journalistic skills, I am able to become the well-rounded PR guru I can be. Because we have to choose a specific journalistic field to major in doesn’t mean we have to limit our abilities. Studying abroad gave me the desire to not become stagnant with relying on what is easy, but to explore what’s challenging. There are so many great ideas and opportunities out there, it just sometimes takes a Bobcat to bring them to life!

-Kate Schroeder is a junior PR major with a psychology minor who studied abroad in Leipzig, Germany summer 2013. Follow her at @kschroeds7.

5 Tips for Creating an Event

March 28, 2013 2 Comments

By: Morgan Blank

Being in Public Relations it is inevitable that we will be planning and putting on events.  The biggest trouble most people have with creating an event is how to make it unforgettable and stand out.  Here are five tips to help plan your event and keep all of your bases covered. 

1. The tip most PR superstars would give it to plan early.  Making a timeline and starting early can help fix problems you may run into later in the event planning process.   

2. Another tip that will help create a lasting impression is to pick a theme and keep it throughout the whole event, starting with the invitations all the way down to table centerpieces. 

3. No matter what kind of event, you need publicity, publicity, publicity.  The more publicity the better, you want to get you event out there, and you want the public talking about it as much as possible. 

4. Have a B plan for everything.  Someone will be late, something may not arrive at all, there is no event where everything goes exactly the way it was planned.  You never want to have to throw something together last minute because something did not pan out the way you wanted.  Try to predict what is more significant to your event and make a back up plan. 

5. Send a recap or overview out right after the event is over.  When the event is over, your job is not.  Within a day or so after the event send out a post event email.  A news letter with the best pictures from the event and a recap of the activities, talking about what a success it was, this will keep the guests chatting over what an awesome time they had. 

When creating an event you need to prepare for the worst and advertise the best.  Keep your guests wondering how you threw such a flawless party, and keep them talking about it.   

Beyond the Basics Regional Conference: A once-in-a-college-career opportunity

March 6, 2013 6 Comments

By: Marisa Dockum 

Image

Beyond the Basics, brought to you by Scripps PRSSA, is a Regional Conference that will unite motivating speakers with ambitious students to learn, network and discuss the latest industry trends.

Regional Conferences are designed for PRSSA Chapters and industry related students to learn about public relations, the communications industry, career development and social media.  This event is a great tool for those who may not be able to attend national events, such as National Conference or National Assembly. 

Taking place on March 16, 2013, Beyond the Basics has planned a jam-packed day of awe-inspiring speakers and break out sessions. 

Keynote speaker: Ben Lincoln, from GolinHarris.

Break out #1: The first break out session will explore social media, with Scripps PRSSA advisor Dan Farkas, industry professional Nate Riggs, and branding guru Ed Burghard. 

Break out #2: During the second break out session, students will learn to deal with crisis management, featuring presentations from the Ohio University Leadership Center and President of Regional Marketing Alliance of Northeast Ohio, Richard Batyko. 

Break out #3: The last break out session #PostGradPRoblems, students will hear from the Ohio University Career Services and industry professional, Demi Clark. 

A more detailed schedule can be found here: http://prssarcbeyond.com/speakers/speakers/

After absorbing an abundance of new knowledge, attendees will have the opportunity to network at the Opportunities Fair. Professionals from different companies and agencies will be there for students to connect with, many regarding prospective career or internship openings.

For updates and more information, visit the Beyond the Basics website: http://prssarcbeyond.com/

This is a once-in-a-college-career opportunity that is taking place right in our backyard.  If you haven’t registered, I strongly encourage you to do so today! The cost is $20 for PRSSA members, and $25 for non-PRSSA members.  Late registration fees will apply beginning after March 12.

Register here: http://prssarcbeyond.eventbrite.com/

Madonna Pushes Instagram Over the ‘Borderline’

March 1, 2013

By: Kiley Landusky

PR Daily recently posted an article on Instagram’s action toward Madonna’s racy pictures posted on its site. In an effort to tame her wild side it created more attention to the star’s account including her flagrant photographs. Madonna posted a screen shot of the email she received from Instagram on its own site. The email told Madonna that her account had violated Instagram’s community guidelines. This generated over 9,000 likes and unleashed over 2,000 comments criticizing how the site handled the situation. A few of the comments read: “Instagram people….really?” “Stupid @instagram,” and “and Rihanna’s photos are not violating?? Give me a break Instagram Team!”. It would appear that these comments were a negative for Instagram, but were actually only adding more attention to the already booming social media.

Was Instagram simply enforcing its community guidelines or just trying to spark attention? It seems to be the latter. The popular page of Instagram seldom lacks photos of girls posing with cleavage out and/or in minuscule bikinis. The fact that they chose to enforce their rules on a multi-decade sex symbol seems quite odd. The Instagram team may have successfully developed a way to build talk of the site and talk of its photos. 

We all know that public relations can get sleazy by use of questionable tactics, such as MTV’s decision to “hack” its own Twitter account. If Instagram is merely attempting to boost its popularity as MTV did, it is doing so in a much cleaner manner. No lies, no posing, no ridiculous scandal; simply enforcing its own rules. Sure, this causes a stir but not the kind of stir that ruins a reputation, just enough to get a few thousand more viewers and to prod its users to generate a lot of comments. With this success story, perhaps Instagram will crack down on celebrity icons breaking their rules more often.

Madonna Pushes Instagram Over the ‘Borderline’

March 1, 2013

By: Kiley Landusky

PR Daily recently posted an article on Instagram’s action toward Madonna’s racy pictures posted on its site. In an effort to tame her wild side it created more attention to the star’s account including her flagrant photographs. Madonna posted a screen shot of the email she received from Instagram on its own site. The email told Madonna that her account had violated Instagram’s community guidelines. This generated over 9,000 likes and unleashed over 2,000 comments criticizing how the site handled the situation. A few of the comments read: “Instagram people….really?” “Stupid @instagram,” and “and Rihanna’s photos are not violating?? Give me a break Instagram Team!”. It would appear that these comments were a negative for Instagram, but were actually only adding more attention to the already booming social media.

Was Instagram simply enforcing its community guidelines or just trying to spark attention? It seems to be the latter. The popular page of Instagram seldom lacks photos of girls posing with cleavage out and/or in minuscule bikinis. The fact that they chose to enforce their rules on a multi-decade sex symbol seems quite odd. The Instagram team may have successfully developed a way to build talk of the site and talk of its photos. 

We all know that public relations can get sleazy by use of questionable tactics, such as MTV’s decision to “hack” its own Twitter account. If Instagram is merely attempting to boost its popularity as MTV did, it is doing so in a much cleaner manner. No lies, no posing, no ridiculous scandal; simply enforcing its own rules. Sure, this causes a stir but not the kind of stir that ruins a reputation, just enough to get a few thousand more viewers and to prod its users to generate a lot of comments. With this success story, perhaps Instagram will crack down on celebrity icons breaking their rules more often.

Tips for the Career Fair

February 14, 2013

By: Whitney Hatano 

If the warm weather and sunshine hasn’t been enough of a clue that spring is among us, then maybe the Spring Career & Internship Fair will be. The fair will be held on Tuesday, February 19, 2013 from 10:00am-3:00pm in Baker Ballroom. Most college students attend at least one career fair in their years at school. At first the concept of a career fair may seem extremely nerve racking and stressful but in the end it is a worthwhile experience. Try not to fret too much; here are a few tips for success at this year’s career fair!

A common piece of advice is to dress professionally! It doesn’t matter whether one is searching for a life long career or just attending the fair for the first time. Chances of a business taking you seriously while you’re still in your PJs are slim to none. First impressions are very crucial and you never know whom you’re going to meet. Being overdressed is more forgivable than being underdressed. The dressed up also does not mean putting on your going out outfit, make sure to clean up and look appropriate.

One of the most important tips is to do your research before the event. With long lines and packed rooms, it’s hard to scope out the entire fair without feeling even more overwhelmed than you probably already are. You also need to take into consideration that not every booth is suitable for you. Researching the companies present beforehand will make it easier for you to filter out which booths are worth stopping at. On the same note, be careful not to rule out any options because you may just be surprised about what a company has to offer. Research different companies by visiting their websites and reading their values and option positions to get a feel for their business. Social media is also becoming a great tool for companies, so try checking out their Twitter or like their Facebook page, too!

Maintaining a positive attitude throughout the day can be tiresome, but keep that smile and handshake firm. If you show you’re genuinely interested in the employer, then they’re going to be just as enthusiastic to give you more information about themselves. Bringing your resume is only half of the battle; you have to have an impressive personality too. Potential employers are not going to want to hire someone who isn’t going to add to their company rapport. Try not to sell yourself too much though, employers want to hear about the real you, not a pitch you’ve repeated to every other booth.

These are only a few tips that can be used to make your career fair experience successful. Just remember to look professional, do your research and bring you’re a-game. Career fairs shouldn’t be scary; they are here to assist students in meeting new people and creating a professional network for free! 

 

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