Ohio University ImPRessions

Ohio University ImPRessions

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There’s No ‘I’ in Team

January 30, 2015

By: Allison Evans, @Allison_Evans

Teamwork and team spirit

We all love that public relations can take us down many avenues, and that no two resumes are the same. However, no matter which workplace you choose, you will have to be a team player. I’ve had so many valuable experiences to teach me what that means, and how far you may need to go for the people we respect and care for.

Team Client

The internship I took on as a freshman taught me that clients value humility and service in their representatives. I advocated for people with developmental disabilities, in the form of marketing their capabilities to local businesses, with the hope of creating employment opportunities for them. In other words, their finances and employment depended on our office. I can’t think of a moment where I felt more accomplished than when my clients opened their checks at the end of the week. I was a part of their team. They needed me, so I needed to do my job for them.

Team Community

One of the largest parts of our job as PR professionals is to inform the community. Working for the Department of Transportation taught me that people really do depend on the information they receive. In this case, knowing the conditions of the roadways meant their safety was dependent on that information. This extended to impaired driving workshops at the local colleges, helping students stay safe.

Our Team

There is no accomplishment within public relations that comes from a single person. With every project produced, there is a group of people that came together to produce it, and that is where the value lies within our profession. My internship with Global Prairie taught how to be a respected member of the internal team by having me cover for someone who was sick, stay late to meet a deadline, answer the phone when I was off and to do anything I could to make life easier for my teammates.

My resume may be full, and the words on it reflect my accomplishments. I am not blind, however, to the fact that these successes are not just my own, and that I couldn’t begin to tackle communication without the help of so many. Where would I be without my teams? I can hardly imagine.

A Guide to Kick Starting Your Internship Search

January 26, 2015

By: Emily Barber, @emilybarbershop

It’s that time of year again, and the smell of internship applications is in the air. While you may have an idea of what you want to do this spring or summer, it can be difficult to figure out where to begin. Anyone would feel overwhelmed after entering “public relations internship” into Google and seeing thousands of results. Not to worry, young grasshopper! Take a deep breath and check out these sites to find your perfect internship.

1. Career Sushi

Career Sushi pic

This website is great for people looking to travel for an internship. With opportunities in California, New York, or Texas, you could really go anywhere! The search bar allows you to limit your search by key words, location, industry, position (choose internship for this one!), company size, and more.

2. PRSSA Internship Center

PRSSA pic

As a disclaimer, you’ll need to be a member of PRSSA for this site, and have your MyPRSA username and password ready. This is an awesome way to take advantage of being a member of PRSSA. There’s even an open spot for a PR intern in Florida, if you want to spend your days off at the beach!

3. internships.com

internships.com pic

Provided by Chegg, a familiar name in the textbook game, internships.com has a plethora of opportunities to browse. Helpful icons let you know if an internship is full or part-time, paid or unpaid, and even if you have any Facebook connections with the company.

4. Dapsity

Dapsity pic

This app you can get on your smartphone, making the internship search even more accessible. It’s like Tinder, but with awesome jobs and internships, instead of creepy pickup lines. Interested? Swipe right. Not so much? Swipe left. Dapsity connects to your Facebook, LinkedIn or email. It then lets you choose keywords and a location and shows you “job cards” that match your inputs. Who knew searching for internships could be so easy?

5.  InternMatch

InternMatch pic

This awesome site allows you to apply for many of its internships directly through the website, making it easy to get your resume out there. Searches can also be broken down into categories like arts, business or entertainment. InternMatch allows you to create a profile that possible employers can browse, so make sure to have an intriguing bio!

6. InternQueen.com

InternQueen pic

Created by the “Intern Queen” herself, Lauren Berger, this site also features a fantastic blog in addition to its many internships. One opportunity is located in London (!!!) and offers experience in PR and marketing.

Why I Will Always Apply for my Dream Internship

January 20, 2015

By: Erica Stonehill, @estonehill13

interns wanted

When it’s time to start applying for internships, it’s important to try and experience every possible route in the PR world: corporate, agency, non-profit, etc. It’s very common that your first internship will be at a firm, close to home. You’re aiming to get your feet wet and learn the ins and outs of the business. That being said, you should always shoot for the stars, and apply for your dream position, whatever that may be at the time. We hear too many stories from working adults about the horrors of nine to five jobs and getting stuck in a rut. What I find most exciting about PR is that there is vast amount of options to do in this business. I could be a publicist for Ed Sheeran, work the red carpet at the Grammy’s, or (the Holy Grail) manage social media for One Direction.

Speaking from my own experience, I have been fascinated with music for as long as I can remember. I realized very early on, however, that I do not have a trace of musical talent in my bones, which is fortunate for the people around me. Rather than allowing this lack of to hinder my desire to work within the industry, I switched my sights to the business side. Anything to bring me as close as possible to the magic of it all.

As internship season quickly approaches, I began searching for any opportunity within a reasonable distance of Lima, Ohio. I find myself punching the ‘APPLY’ button for a concert venue or record label that I really would like to work for. While I know it’s a long-shot to score my first internship with Columbia Records, it can’t hurt to try. The worst they can do is tell me no, and to apply again in the future.

We should never let the fear of being inexperienced, or too young, keep us away from going after the positions we want. Keep applying for those dream internships, get your name into the system (they may remember you when you apply next year) and build up your resume. A rejection never killed anyone. With  so many possibilities in this business, there is nothing wrong with taking risks and actively working toward those dream positions.

9 Ways to Put an End to Your Boredom Over Winter Break

December 3, 2014

By: Elizabeth Harris @elizharris32

winter break

Students generally cannot wait to get home for winter break. It gives us time to relax after a stressful semester of schoolwork. The first week or so is usually full of holiday shopping, catching up with hometown friends and binge watching Netflix. However, by the time the last two weeks of break roll around, the boredom usually sets in. The phrases “I just cannot wait to get back to school,” “There’s nothing to do here,” “I miss my college friends” “I’m sick of sitting around doing nothing,” are spoken amongst many college students.

Well, for those students who find themselves uttering those phrases, there are many productive things to do to fill up those dreaded times of boredom.

  1. Try to find a seasonal job. Some stores need extra help during the holiday season, and it is always nice to make some extra cash. Also, look into babysitting opportunities – parents often need someone to watch their kids so they can go shopping or wrap presents.
  2. Fine-tune you resume. No matter what, there are always ways to make your resume better.
  3. Apply to internships. Many times companies start review applications in January. There are myriad internship opportunities out there. Take the time to research ones you think would be a good fit and apply to as many as possible to have options.
  4. Build your LinkedIn profile. Employers are increasingly using LinkedIn during the hiring process. You do not want to decrease your chances of getting an internship or job because you do not have a LinkedIn or because your profile is weak.
  5. Participate in community service. The holiday season is the best time of year to give back to the community. Look into volunteering at the local food bank or ringing the bell for the Salvation Army.
  6. Workout. With all of the great holiday food and the eating out that usually occurs during break, working out is never a bad idea. It’s also just a great way to fill your downtime in general.
  7. Visit your college friend’s hometowns. It’s always fun to see where your friends grew up.
  8. Shadow someone in your field of interest. It’s never a bad idea to get as much experience as possible in the career field you hope to hold a job one day.
  9. Do a random act of kindness. Part of the holiday season is all about giving back. Why not make someone happy when he or she is not necessarily expecting it?

And, once you are done doing all of these productive things, take the time to do even more Netflix binge watching, you deserve it!

Summer Reflection Series: Erin Golden

September 15, 2014 2 Comments

By: Erin Golden @erinngolden

erinngoldenThis summer, I had the pleasure of interning at MediaSource in Columbus, Ohio. I was one of two Media Relations interns that received credit for a 10-week internship – and I truly believe that an internship experience is a must-do for anyone wanting to work in this fast-paced field.

When you complete an internship, the usual thought process then leads to: what exactly did I learn? So here are a few things I learned about the world of media relations.

  1. I don’t want to work solely in media relations. I think this part is extremely necessary coming out of any internship. Figuring out what you don’t love is just as important as determining what you do. Even though I wouldn’t mind working a bit in the media relations department, having a role that only consists of contacting/working with the media isn’t exactly where I see myself. I left MediaSource with the utmost respect for my co-workers – their job is hard!
  2. Building relationships is crucial. As I quickly found out, a client/agency relationship isn’t just based on results – it’s based on trust. My co-workers would assign each other calls and follow-ups with specific reporter or outlet just because they had previously pitched them many successful stories. Trust is essential, whether it be with an agency’s client or the media.
  3. Asking for help or an explanation really is good advice. Everyone has probably read blogs about starting an internship that all say “ask questions!” They are right. I never felt stupid or incompetent asking questions, and I know I learned so much more by asking for projects to do.

As the semester begins and most of us transition from internship back to schoolwork, I’ve made a few goals for myself:

  1. Be a good mentor to an underclassman. I know that most of what I’ve learned by being in PRSSA and ImPRessions has actually come from watching the upperclassmen and asking them their advice. I even ask advice from my fellow seniors all the time. The good thing about Scripps is that everyone around is smart and hardworking. I’d love to help someone else with their goals this year.
  2. Create a good foundation for the Fluff Bakery account. As the AE for Fluff this year, I’m excited to be given the opportunity to start a new client’s relationship with ImPRessions.
  3. Improve my resume – again and again. As all of us seniors started freaking out about jobs. I think it’s important to remember that as students, we are constantly gaining experience. Therefore I need to keep my resume updated. When spring rolls around, who knows who might be reading it!

Should I add Personality into my Resume?

August 5, 2014

By: Kate Schroeder @kschroeds7

resume

Resume building and writing cover letters has to be the most daunting and dreadfully boring tasks of the job or internship search process. Personally, I would rather sit in an extra hour of interviews than to summarize my skills on an 8 ½ x 11 sheet of paper. However, this process still stands as one of the most important in the application process. I admit I am not an expert; I still reference my how to guides and our awesome ImPRessions blog for hints and tips. Nevertheless, using the cut-and-dry formats and the basic structures I realized that none of my personality was shining through. How are future employers going to know who I am and how I can better there company without being creative and expressive? This is why I believe that putting personality in your resume is the secret ingredient to go from a contender to “I got the job!”

So why do we need to put personality into a resume? Don’t employers just want to see if you have the necessary skills to do the job well? Well yes … and no. It is essential to have the skill set to be successful at the job you are applying for. It is also important to show you fit into the job you are applying for. Employers are looking for someone who is going to better their company and enhance their employee atmosphere. Are you an outgoing person, or are you quiet and reserved? If your personality shines through your resume, you will be more likely to be asked back for an interview. Also, it’s a benefit to you. You want to be sure you get a position at a company is right for you!

You may ask, “But how do I put my personality into my resume? Where is there room?” The biggest opportunity for showcasing your personality is through the design of your resume. I try and re-design my resume for each position I apply for (granted I have the time). Have one basic resume you can hand out on the fly that best describes your personality through over-all design. When applying for specific positions feel free to take create and alter your design to fit that position, just like you alter your resume’s content to fit your position. This past school year I applied for a position in the Women’s Panhellenic Association. I took that opportunity to add more bright, girly colors and quirky shapes. I also visually represented more skills instead of typing them out. If you are creative let it show! This will show potential employers that you don’t just talk the talk, but walk the walk as well.

If design is not your forte it’s okay! There are many other ways to show your personality through your resume! One way to do that is to write how you speak in your cover letter and resume. You should still stay formal since it is a professional piece of writing, but you don’t need to fill in the blanks from every how to guide. Instead of saying, “In reference to the recent opening at company XYZ” say, “I was thrilled to learn that the such-and-such position at company XYZ because it is exactly the job I want to apply for. “ Don’t be coy or shy. Say outright if you have certain qualities that fit the job position and let your potential employer know you and no one else is the right person for the job!

 

Why a Personal Blog/Website looks Good on a Resume

August 1, 2014

By: Morgan Peterson @mopeeeezy

When trying to land the perfect dream job, it’s important to find a way to stand out to the employer. Sure you might have a perfect resume and transcript, but you are a dime a dozen to some employers. If you don’t get the opportunity to get an interview, a personal website is one of the best ways to stand out from other candidates.

Showcase Your Work

With a personal website, you can market yourself and your work, however you want to. By creating this website you have an exclusive space of your best work. It’s also easy for employers to click and see if they like you, allowing the experience on your resume come to life. Also by showing the work that you do, it shows employers that you have enough pride and confidence in your work to showcase it to the world.

Build Your Brand

Building a website allows you to create a virtual gallery of all of your best work. Even though social media is great, a personal website is just that – personal. You don’t have to worry about trying to stand out because it’s your website. It shows that you care enough about your work and your brand if you took time out to create a full website for it. It’s the one space on the Internet that is all yours so really put some time and effort into building it. Maybe take a weekend just for personal branding. Some great places to start to make a website would be weebly.com, wix.com, fourspace.com or WordPress.com. These website building sites are easy to use and not expensive to acquire your own personal domain. Who knows you could get a job just by an employer looking at your website!

You aren’t the norm

Not many people have their own personal website so by making one you’re already one step ahead! It also shows that you have acquired specials skills to build a website. Learning how to build a website helps you to gain many skills especially when it comes to programming or coding. In PR it’s often good to know how to work with technical things because you never know when you might be asked to design something on the fly. This allows you to be a really well rounded candidate.

Flaunt What You’ve Got: Keeping an Online Portfolio

July 23, 2014

By: Lindsey Zimmerman @lindseyzim716

Any time you go through the tedious-yet-rewarding process of applying for internships and jobs, it’s almost a given that you’ll be asked to provide a writing sample at some point. A solid example of excellent writing can really put you ahead of the game as more and more PR industry employers are looking for candidates who really have a way with words. With that being said, it’s not always easy to pick out just one or two pieces of writing to showcase, especially if you’re like me and you’ve been writing for a wide variety of student publications and blogs all throughout college.

This is where the online portfolio can really come in handy. Everyone in the public relations industry, from the seasoned professional to the aspiring student, knows that a portfolio is crucial for showing what you’ve accomplished in your career. In today’s increasingly digital and technological society, it’s easier than ever before to keep all of your professional work organized in one place.

I use clippings.me for my online portfolio and keep a link to it right at the top of my email signature so that it catches people’s eye and (hopefully) intrigues them enough to click. I like clippings.me because of the easy, eye-catching organizational options. Every piece of work I’ve done, both for student organizations and for internships, is listed and organized first by publication and then by date. I also have a link to my resume at the very top. This site works well for written work, which is the bulk of what I have, but if you’re interested in showing off your design skills, Mashable has this great list of options for building a more artistic online portfolio.

An online portfolio is a great way to show off your work every chance you get. You can link to it on any social network, from your Twitter bio to your LinkedIn profile, in order to show off your work to anyone who may come across your online presence. It’s also a great way to keep your work organized when you need to provide a sample – simply scroll through your online portfolio and pick something out, as opposed to searching through old blogs and digital files to find that one perfect piece that really showcases what you have to offer.

Beyond showing off your creative talents, this is a great way to prove to potential employers and others in your network that you know how to stay organized, as well as consistent with your personal brand. Customize the layout and design of your site to match your blog, resume, business cards or anything else that reflects your professional self.

With an online portfolio, the possibilities are endless. If you don’t have one already, set aside some time to put one together and link to it wherever you see fit. In the long run, it will only be beneficial.

Increasing Facebook Engagement One Step at a Time

July 22, 2014

By: Annie Beard @annie_beard

Before starting my internship this summer, I thought I knew pretty much everything I needed to know about social media, including Facebook, but I was wrong. Throughout the past two months, I have learned a lot about this social channel and what works for increasing engagement.

  1. Pay to play. Facebook’s organic reach has declined. Less and less people are seeing posts that you work hard to create, which means less people are engaging. Unfortunately, if you want to increase engagement, you will have to pay to boost your posts. Personally, I don’t think boosting every post is necessary, just the important posts. For example, if your company gets publicity and you share it on your Facebook page that is a post I would boost. If your company is hosting a webinar or added a new blog post to its page – those are posts I would write and boost.
  2. Use images. Images will catch your audience’s eye, and people are more likely to share a post with a fun photo. Posts with photos get 39 percent more interaction, according to NerdGraph. If you can post behind the scenes photos of your company’s employees, location or events, this is a great way to get people engaged and give them the inside scoop on your company, giving your brand a personality.
  3. Ask for engagement. If you want someone to share or like a post, ask for it. Many times, if you include a simple call to action in your status, it is likely that people will play along, doing what you asked for. If you get engagement, make sure you are always engaging back! This is important. People engage with you because they want a two-way experience, not one-way.
  4. Check your insights. Facebook insights can be very helpful when you are deciding when or what to post. Check to see what time the largest amount of your fans is online and then schedule post for that time. This will help to increase your organic reach so more people see your post. Also check insights on what the most popular types of posts have been in the past. This will help you decide if you should post a link, a text-only status, a photo, video, etc.

These are four steps that I have found helpful in getting more engagement on Facebook. I hope you found them helpful, too!

Check out this infographic for more tips on increasing Facebook engagement!

FB

How to Connect With Someone You Don’t Know, but Want to

July 9, 2014

By: Sydney Gardner @sydneygardner

two tweets“It’s all about who you know.” It’s been said time and time again. To a PR student, connecting with professionals can often appear too intimidating to even try, but have no fear! Social media is a great way to connect with professionals in a less stressful environment! Taking a few easy steps will allow you to not only connect with someone you don’t’ know, but probably impress them along the way as well.

Know Their Work

Professionals may be flattered at you fan-girling over how pretty their office is, or who their clients are, but nothing shows your genuine interest better than knowing what they have done. Look up case studies, check out their blog and really read them! This not only gives you the chance to get a true idea of what type of work they do, but it also helps you see if this person is all you’ve cracked them up to be. By being able to discuss a person’s work with them, in and educated and informed manner, you show that you are truly interested in their career industry.

Interact With Them

So now that you have studied up on the person/company/brand that you love, it’s time to let them know. Social media is all about having real conversations so just remember to be yourself. I think one of the best ways to show them you like their work is to share their blog, tweets, etc. Networking on social media allows you to create a more casual environment to interact. Twitter is a great platform for starting conversations with professionals because you aren’t expected (or allowed) to write a lot. Just tell them, and your followers, why you like it. You may even get a reply or a follow from it! You can also comment on their work if you don’t want to share it. Be aware to not over do mentions and comments though! You want to show the person you admire what they do, not that you’re obsessed with them (even if you are).

Connect

Now that you’ve laid the foundation for connection, it’s time to take the plunge. I think connecting on LinkedIn is a great midway point between Twitter and email. I recommend connecting on LinkedIn within a few days of having a conversation on social media. Remember to always write an actual note on the invite, not the generic one given. Remind them of the conversation and let them know why you want to connect. Don’t be afraid of rejection. Most professionals will welcome connecting with an enthusiastic student with open arms.

Social media may not scream professionalism to some, but it can be great tool for you to reach out to people you want to connect with.  Social media has the unique ability to blend your personal life with your professional one, and that allows you to form genuine connections with people. When you interact with professionals on social media you are able to highlight you’re unique blend of personality and professionalism. So next time you are looking to network, turn to social media. You may be surprised at how successful you will be.

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