Ohio University ImPRessions

Ohio University ImPRessions

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What’s Better – Vine vs. Instagram?

December 3, 2013 1 Comment

vineOne of the big questions in the social media world since Instagram video came out is, which better; Vine or Instagram? The answer to this question lies within the personal preference of the user. There are pros and cons to each platform and each of these pros and cons lead to the ultimate decision that the user will make. If this is a question that still bounces around in your mind, here’s a list of pros and cons to ease your mind a bit:

Why Vine Rocks:

  • A six second time limit forces a Vine user to think outside the box and be as innovative as possible.
  • Vine constantly loops the video, so if you miss something you can watch it again.
  • Twitter and Vine are linked together, so when you post something on Vine it automatically goes to your Twitter page, too.

Why Instagram Rocks:

  • Instagram has a longer recording time (15 seconds) which allows more time to film a typical TV spot.
  • The app also offers more creativity with filters and editing features that enhance the display of the video.
  • Instagram also allows to share on not just Facebook and Twitter, but also Tumblr, Flickr and Foursquare.

Not So Good About Vine:

  • Vine lacks editing tools and style filters.
  • You can’t pull prerecorded videos from camera roll.
  • Vine’s user numbers have decreased 2.9 million to 1.35 million, a 50 percent decrease.

Troubles With Instagram:

  • Instagram doesn’t have the looping option for videos.
  • Just like Vine, Instagram doesn’t support pulling prerecorded videos from camera roll.
  • Because of the 15 second time limit, there are complaints of the video taking too long to load.

With these pros and cons in mind, a user now has a better chance of making a decision that is in line with their personal preference. Whatever the choice, with practice and proper use, you’ll become a video pro in no time!

-Ali Cupelli is a senior majoring in strategic communication. Follow her at @ali__cup .

4 Ways to Make Instagram Meaningful for Your Brand

July 18, 2013 2 Comments

InstagramInstagram has pretty impressive statistics: over 130 million monthly active users, 16 billion total photos shared, 1 billion daily likes and 45 million photos per day. The numbers are only growing now that the owner, Facebook, has thrown video into the mix, crushing Vine in the process.

People with really interesting cups of coffee aren’t the only ones using Instagram; 54% of brands are on the site with 25% posting at least one photo a week. According to Simply Measured, the brands that have adopted Instagram as a platform in August 2011 have seen month-over-month growth, creating a huge gap between them and other brands that are not on the social site.

Here are a few tips on how to use Instagram for YOUR brand:

1. Get your followers involved

Put the social back into social media and interact with your fans. Ask them to share their own content and then #regram it or create contests to engage your audience. The brand Starbucks is a good example of a social brand. It says right in their Instagram bio to tag photos with #Starbucks, and over 3.5 million people have done so. Starbucks then shares the photos on their Instagram and Facebook pages to finish off the social loop.

2. Show how your product is made

This can apply to pretty much any brand. Show a t-shirt getting printed, someone roasting coffee beans or the creation of an engine. Take little snap shots of the product from start to finish and let the fans see just how much love goes into your product. Louisville Slugger does a good job of this. As you scroll through their Instagram photos you’ll see a block of wood, an unfinished baseball bat, a worker dipping the bat in color and then a major leaguer hitting a homerun with Louisville Slugger in hand. 

3. Give people a behind the scenes look

When people think they are getting an exclusive look at something, they will continue to come back for more. And if you put those exciting buzz words like “first look”, “exclusive” or “behind the scenes”; you’re doing even better. Burberry does a great job at giving fans an exclusive look. Their Instagram features images and videos from backstage at fashion shows, photo shoots and even the making of their collection.

4. Show the company culture

Give your fans a glimpse into your world and share your brand’s voice. Show them who your employees are, what your office looks like and even what snacks your team is having during break. If you let people in to your world they will better connect, engage and stay! Urban Outfitters does a great job of showing off their brand’s culture. The chill, down-to-earth vibe of their Instagram pictures has captured fans and gotten Urban Outfitters almost 850,000 followers.

As you can see, the social site can be used for more than filtered pictures of food and sunsets, it can be used as a platform for brands to engage with fans and show people what a company is all about. Images speak louder than words, so pick up your IPhone and start Instagram-ing some ‘like’ worthy images for your brand.

-Angela Martin is a senior studying strategic communication. Follow her on Twitter @_angelamartin.

 

Happiest 5k Takes on Social Media

June 10, 2013

Color RunMost of us have heard of The Happiest 5k on the Planet, known best as The Color Run. For those that haven’t, this is a run that has taken the world by storm with races in Australia, Brazil, Chile, the Netherlands, Portugal, the United Kingdom and all over the United States. Participants wear all white and are doused with 5 different colors as they pass each kilometer. The race has grown immensely from its start in 2012 and will have more than a million participants in 100 events in 2013.

One of The Color Run’s greatest strengths has been its use of social media to spread its message of healthiness, happiness, individuality and giving back to the community. When and where did you first see the pictures of people jumping in the air throwing paint powder?

Twitter

Leading the forefront of today’s social media, Twitter is a unique space for event-related content. It allows those not present to follow the event in real time and keep the atmosphere and impact of the race going far after it is over.

@TheColorRun has 46,497 followers currently for its U.S. account and uses separate accounts for each country. They receive great interaction utilizing #ColorRunner and #Happiest5k as well as responding to a great number of the people that tweet at them. One of the best parts of The Color Run is the phenomenal pictures taken there. Tweets with multimedia have been shown to increase engagement dramatically. These intensely interactive pictures lend themselves well to other forms of social media that not all companies have been able to effectively utilize.

Instagram

Instagram is all about sharing a visual experience that people can relate to; the perfect site for blasts of color and promoting health and happiness.

TheColorRun has 20,000 followers on Instagram. They not only share pictures that imply the run will be the best time of your life, but use the photos to spread engagement to their other social media platforms such as YouTube.  Even though they use different outlets, The Color Run does a great job of creating one cohesive brand image throughout their messaging. For example, they continue to use the hash tags #happiest5k and #colorrunner, making it easy for followers to connect on both Instagram and Twitter. The group also shares pictures of their sponsors’ stands in order to pull from their sponsors’ customer base.

Vine

One of the newest players in social media is the short video sharing application called Vine, and The Color Run is already taking advantage of this platform. Their first vine was on June 2, 2013 and they already have 1,938 followers and 244 likes for their first post.

To find out more about The Color Run and potential races in your area visit http://thecolorrun.com/

-Ann Watercutter is a junior studying strategic communications with a minor in business and a marketing specialization. Keep up with Ann at @AWatercutter.

Madonna Pushes Instagram Over the ‘Borderline’

March 1, 2013

By: Kiley Landusky

PR Daily recently posted an article on Instagram’s action toward Madonna’s racy pictures posted on its site. In an effort to tame her wild side it created more attention to the star’s account including her flagrant photographs. Madonna posted a screen shot of the email she received from Instagram on its own site. The email told Madonna that her account had violated Instagram’s community guidelines. This generated over 9,000 likes and unleashed over 2,000 comments criticizing how the site handled the situation. A few of the comments read: “Instagram people….really?” “Stupid @instagram,” and “and Rihanna’s photos are not violating?? Give me a break Instagram Team!”. It would appear that these comments were a negative for Instagram, but were actually only adding more attention to the already booming social media.

Was Instagram simply enforcing its community guidelines or just trying to spark attention? It seems to be the latter. The popular page of Instagram seldom lacks photos of girls posing with cleavage out and/or in minuscule bikinis. The fact that they chose to enforce their rules on a multi-decade sex symbol seems quite odd. The Instagram team may have successfully developed a way to build talk of the site and talk of its photos. 

We all know that public relations can get sleazy by use of questionable tactics, such as MTV’s decision to “hack” its own Twitter account. If Instagram is merely attempting to boost its popularity as MTV did, it is doing so in a much cleaner manner. No lies, no posing, no ridiculous scandal; simply enforcing its own rules. Sure, this causes a stir but not the kind of stir that ruins a reputation, just enough to get a few thousand more viewers and to prod its users to generate a lot of comments. With this success story, perhaps Instagram will crack down on celebrity icons breaking their rules more often.

Madonna Pushes Instagram Over the ‘Borderline’

March 1, 2013

By: Kiley Landusky

PR Daily recently posted an article on Instagram’s action toward Madonna’s racy pictures posted on its site. In an effort to tame her wild side it created more attention to the star’s account including her flagrant photographs. Madonna posted a screen shot of the email she received from Instagram on its own site. The email told Madonna that her account had violated Instagram’s community guidelines. This generated over 9,000 likes and unleashed over 2,000 comments criticizing how the site handled the situation. A few of the comments read: “Instagram people….really?” “Stupid @instagram,” and “and Rihanna’s photos are not violating?? Give me a break Instagram Team!”. It would appear that these comments were a negative for Instagram, but were actually only adding more attention to the already booming social media.

Was Instagram simply enforcing its community guidelines or just trying to spark attention? It seems to be the latter. The popular page of Instagram seldom lacks photos of girls posing with cleavage out and/or in minuscule bikinis. The fact that they chose to enforce their rules on a multi-decade sex symbol seems quite odd. The Instagram team may have successfully developed a way to build talk of the site and talk of its photos. 

We all know that public relations can get sleazy by use of questionable tactics, such as MTV’s decision to “hack” its own Twitter account. If Instagram is merely attempting to boost its popularity as MTV did, it is doing so in a much cleaner manner. No lies, no posing, no ridiculous scandal; simply enforcing its own rules. Sure, this causes a stir but not the kind of stir that ruins a reputation, just enough to get a few thousand more viewers and to prod its users to generate a lot of comments. With this success story, perhaps Instagram will crack down on celebrity icons breaking their rules more often.

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