Ohio University ImPRessions

Ohio University ImPRessions

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Scripps College vs. Scripps J School [infographic]

August 7, 2014 1 Comment

By: Kerry Tuttle @kerrtut

Instead of writing about the differences between the Scripps College of Communication and the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, Kerry Tuttle put it all in an infographic.

Scripps_ImPR

For all the Incoming Scripps Kids

August 6, 2014

By: Kelly Hayes @kmshayes

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It’s almost here: the day when you finally walk through College Green and are officially a Bobcat. We are one giant happy family, with a few mishaps here and there. However, for all of you freshman new to the Scripps school, you made the right choice. Welcome to the happiest place on earth.

As a senior entering my last semester at Ohio University, I can only enter it with bittersweet feelings. This summer I spent my time interning at Ogilvy & Mather in Chicago, ready to enter the adult world… boy will I miss Scripps.

What to expect your first few weeks

You are going to go to many, many meetings. I encourage you to go to as many as you want. Sign up for every email list possible, because to find your niche in Scripps you have to try. I signed up for four email lists when I was a freshman – Thread Magazine, PRSSA, ImPRessions and RTDNA. I stuck with two: PRSSA and ImPRessions.

Don’t feel pressured

You do not have to stick to one track. If you want to write for the post and work with WOUB, go for it! The amazing thing about Scripps is that you have the advantage to do what you want to. You’re not stuck in one place because that’s the norm, we all have different paths within the Scripps school – and it’s made us better journalists, writers, editors, PR professionals, advertising gurus and broadcast anchors because of it.

Speak up and try

You won’t know if you like something until you try. Volunteer if it sounds interesting to you. I volunteered for so much in the beginning and it started to overwhelm me a little, but many people will be in the same position as you. And for all the seniors – we’ve been there and won’t bite. Scripps kids stick together.

Talk to your professors, they are much cooler than you think

I would give a shout-out to all of my favorite journalism professors right now, but I’d just be listing all of them. I’ve never had a bad professor, and they give amazing advice. When I had my phone interview for Ogilvy & Mather, I went to Professor Farkas asking for advice –it definitely was great advice because here I am, eight weeks into my dream internship.

Say Hi

Again, we seniors don’t bite. I always love meeting new people in Scripps and helping them out with anything they need. If you’re a freshman, say hi. I was a shy person my freshman year at those PRSSA and Thread meetings, but eventually I just said hi and it all worked out.

Be prepared for the best three to four years of your life

2014-07-10 18.09.06I say three to four because I’m graduating a semester early, but I wouldn’t be where I am today without Scripps. I’ve accomplished so much in my college career with the help of ImPRessions, PRSSA, my professors and friends. I will be very, very sad to leave this place in December, but I know I can always come back and visit the place that helped me get to where I am today: The E.W. Scripps School of Journalism.

 

Successful Scrippsters

May 27, 2014 4 Comments

By: Sydney Gardner @sydneygardner

E.W. Scripps is more than a person or a school – it’s a state of mind. Students have studied at Ohio University’s Journalism school for decades, but it isn’t what they did in their four (or five) years at Ohio University that sets them apart. It’s what they did when they graduate that truly shows why Scripps is a name that carries prestige. I wanted to take a moment to highlight some recent and not so recent grads of Scripps that have found success beyond the bricks of Athens.

Aaron BrownAs a proud member of the Scripps’ Public Relations Student Society of America, no list of mine would dare to start without Aaron Brown. Aaron graduated from Ohio University in 2001 and has been a PR Success ever since. While at Ohio University Aaron was a proud PRSSA member and had internships at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide and Babcock & Wilcox. In 2008, Aaron joined the team at Fahlgren Mortine Public Relations as an Associate Vice President. His hard work and Scripps-bred work ethic allowed him to rise to his current position of Senior Vice President. Aaron Brown has traditionally been the speaker at the first Scripps PRSSA meeting of the school year in the fall, so make sure to stop by and meet this success this fall!

Amanda Stefanik graduated from E.W. Scripps in 2012 and has been succeeding ever since. During her years at Ohio University, Amanda was a member of PRSSA, ImPRessions, AVW and Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. She also held various internships including one with the Miss Universe Organization. Upon graduation, Amanda accepted a job at PR Newswire where she currently works as Business Development Representative. Her role includes working with business across all industries to better their marketing and communication efforts.

Devin BartolottaDevin Bartolotta graduated from E.W. Scripps in 2013 with a focus in broadcast journalism. While at Ohio University, Devin interned with WABC-TV’s investigative unit in New York, NY, and with WTAE-TV in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. Devin was also a member of Omicron Gamma chapter of Delta Zeta Sorority, and part of the winning team at the first Scripps Innovation Challenge. After graduating Devin accepted a Weekend Anchor Position at Rochester, Minnesota’s NBC affiliate, KTTC-TV. Within her first year in a brand new state, Devin survived winter, adopted a puppy and won the Associated Press’ first place award in the 2013 Minnesota Broadcast contest for her “Hearts of Hope” story. Devin’s work at KTTC and her ability to move and make the most out of a career in a new place demonstrates exactly why she is successful Scrippster in my eyes.

I met Allison Jordan at the first PRSSA meeting of the 2012 school year. Even then, I, and many others, knew Allison would do great things. As the 2012-2013 president of Scripps PRSSA, Allison was able to show that she was already a professional and a leader even before graduating. While at Ohio University, Allison was able to leave her mark on Scripps though her commitment to PRSSA and her willingness to mentor any and every underclassmen that reached out to her. Upon graduating in Spring 2013, Allison moved to Chicago to work for Zocalo Group, but has recently accepted and Account Executive position at Global Prairie in Cleveland. Her hard work and attitude truly exemplifies what it means to be a Scripps success and a Bobcat Alumni.

Narrowing down the list of Successful Scrippsters was no easy task, but that’s what makes Scripps so special. The fact remains that there are so many graduates of Scripps that I and many others consider successful. Scripps breeds success, and it’s only for the sake of word count that this list ends at four of them.  Make the most of your years at OU – you never know where those experiences will take you, and good luck to all of our 2014 Scripps grads! (Even though you probably don’t need it.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are Bloggers really Journalists?

April 17, 2014

bloggingAddressing the issues of journalism and blogging can be quite tricky. The negative connotations lent to citizen journalism make it hard for bloggers to be taken seriously. However, many blogs are run by renowned journalists and apply the tools of the trade learned in journalism schools across the country. So to answer the question if bloggers are journalists: yes… and no. It all depends on your answer of what a journalist really is.

Why all bloggers are journalists

If a journalist is simply someone that writes, every blogger is a journalist. Blogs are written; therefore the bloggers that write them can carry the title of a journalist. If a journalist is someone that spreads news, every blogger is a journalist. News can mean many things to many different people, but what you write about will always matter to one person, making it news. Similar to newspaper and magazine articles, blogs vary widely in topics. Niche markets can also be very popular with both bloggers and print journalists, making even the smallest population of consumers happy.

Why all bloggers are not journalists

As I have previously stated, blogs are easy for anyone and a good starter tool. This includes people that are not well versed in the forms of AP Style, how to format a blog and grammar rules. This leads to blogs and citizen journalism having an unprofessional connotation. This assumption of unprofessional writing does not bode well with the professional journalists of the world. However, what is a journalist? If a journalist is someone that has taken classes and graduated from a journalism school, while having professional training, all bloggers are not journalists. The negative connotation that comes with citizen journalism has a lot to do with journalists in the sense that they went to a journalism school and worked hard for their degree – unlike some citizen journalists. The notion that citizen journalists can do the same work as a trained journalist is ridiculous to someone that has endured 4+ years of training for a career in Journalism.

Overall, it can be hard to distinguish whether a blogger is a journalist. When it comes down to it, just look at the writing and content presented. If you find it professional, it doesn’t really matter whether that person attended a journalism school. Above all, listen to your gut and don’t back down when discussing what you truly believe in. After all, your most important client is yourself.

Gentry Bennet is a freshman studying Strategic Communications. You can follow her on Twitter at @Gen_andTonic.

What if Bobcats started their own PR Firm?

January 28, 2014 2 Comments

bobcatsThere have been many times that my friends and I have had discussions on how it would be if there were a PR firm that was owned and operated by Ohio University alumni? The answer: amazing!

We are already on a good start since there is our student-run PR firm, ImPRessions. So we have that going for us.

The mornings would most likely start out with the playing of the fight song or the alma mater to get our day going on the right foot, followed by sweet treats catered by Fluff Bakery.

Just about every desk would have an Athens brick, a “Pubs of Athens” poster, an Ohio University coffee mug, thermos and water bottle, and pictures of dear friends that we celebrated many nights with on the hallowed streets of Athens.

burritoLunch would be filled with the scent of Goodfellas pizza, and Burrito Buggy would have its own parking space.

There would be cubicle shuffles.

East, West and South Greens would designate different departments in the office.

There would be our own Scripps statue to give associates luck before client pitches.

Casual Fridays would most likely be, “wear your OU hoodie day.”

There would be an office cat named Rufus.

And of course, there would be a bar for the office with Jackie O’s on tap, where happy hour would be a regular occasion with recordings from The Bob Stewart band on repeat.

Working with only Ohio University alumni would give clients the opportunity to work with the most fun and driven people in the industry. If there is one thing that students in Athens know is how to work just as hard as they play.

Because of ImPRessions, students already have a small grasp on what it is like to be in an agency. We have around 100 colleagues and now 12 clients. We know how to support different clients to better the agency as a whole. ImPRessions is a group of students with high ambitions that know how to push each other in a positive way. With the backing of a journalism education and a think tank of bright, young Bobcats, in a real PR firm we would be an unstoppable firm with clients just as fun and hard working as we are.

- Ben Clos is a junior studying Strategic Communications. Follow Ben on Twitter at @BenClos1

Should You Switch Journalism Tracks?

August 19, 2013 1 Comment

JournalismEntering my freshman year at Ohio University, I wanted to be a journalist. To me, being a journalist meant working for a newspaper or magazine in New York City and writing every day for the rest of my career. This seemed exciting, but little did I know that this was only the very beginning of where journalism could take me.

I’ve always enjoyed exploring and trying new things, so I signed up for plenty of clubs outside of print journalism. One of those clubs was PRSSA. At the beginning of the year, I didn’t really understand what public relations consisted of or how to build a career out of it, so I kept a close eye on the strategic communications track in order to learn more.

Everyone talked about ImPRessions and how it went hand in hand with PRSSA, so second semester I decided to sign up for ImPRessions as well. After getting hands on experience and getting a better look at what public relations really is, I knew this was the right track for me. It took a lot of exploring and open-mindedness to discover that this was my path, but I am so glad that I took the time to look outside of the box.

As you probably know, it is very common to change your major at some point during your college career. Going away for the first time allows you to take a better look at yourself and what you want out of life. My views changed drastically in just one year of college, and will most likely continue to grow and develop as I do. With that being said, it is important to stay open to career changes or developments.

You shouldn’t worry about changing your major or track so much that you stay put where you are, because at the end of the day, it is important to be happy and enjoy your career. I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I stuck with a major that was no longer the right fit for me because I was scared of what may happen.

If you’re unsure what you want to do or what path you want to take; explore. Take the time to look into different avenues and make sure you talk to people in each of them. I wouldn’t have signed up for ImPRessions or learned as much as I did about public relations if I didn’t talk to people in the strategic communications track. There is no better way to learn about something than by asking questions and finding out the facts. Never be afraid of what may happen if you change your mind and remember to just go for it! At the end of the day, you will be happy you did. I am so glad I took the chance to explore the strategic communications and take the leap to change.

-Jessica Carnprobst is a sophomore studying strategic communications. Follow Jessica at @Jess_Carnprobst.

5 Tips for Creating an Event

March 28, 2013 2 Comments

By: Morgan Blank

Being in Public Relations it is inevitable that we will be planning and putting on events.  The biggest trouble most people have with creating an event is how to make it unforgettable and stand out.  Here are five tips to help plan your event and keep all of your bases covered. 

1. The tip most PR superstars would give it to plan early.  Making a timeline and starting early can help fix problems you may run into later in the event planning process.   

2. Another tip that will help create a lasting impression is to pick a theme and keep it throughout the whole event, starting with the invitations all the way down to table centerpieces. 

3. No matter what kind of event, you need publicity, publicity, publicity.  The more publicity the better, you want to get you event out there, and you want the public talking about it as much as possible. 

4. Have a B plan for everything.  Someone will be late, something may not arrive at all, there is no event where everything goes exactly the way it was planned.  You never want to have to throw something together last minute because something did not pan out the way you wanted.  Try to predict what is more significant to your event and make a back up plan. 

5. Send a recap or overview out right after the event is over.  When the event is over, your job is not.  Within a day or so after the event send out a post event email.  A news letter with the best pictures from the event and a recap of the activities, talking about what a success it was, this will keep the guests chatting over what an awesome time they had. 

When creating an event you need to prepare for the worst and advertise the best.  Keep your guests wondering how you threw such a flawless party, and keep them talking about it.   

Beyond the Basics Regional Conference: A once-in-a-college-career opportunity

March 6, 2013 6 Comments

By: Marisa Dockum 

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Beyond the Basics, brought to you by Scripps PRSSA, is a Regional Conference that will unite motivating speakers with ambitious students to learn, network and discuss the latest industry trends.

Regional Conferences are designed for PRSSA Chapters and industry related students to learn about public relations, the communications industry, career development and social media.  This event is a great tool for those who may not be able to attend national events, such as National Conference or National Assembly. 

Taking place on March 16, 2013, Beyond the Basics has planned a jam-packed day of awe-inspiring speakers and break out sessions. 

Keynote speaker: Ben Lincoln, from GolinHarris.

Break out #1: The first break out session will explore social media, with Scripps PRSSA advisor Dan Farkas, industry professional Nate Riggs, and branding guru Ed Burghard. 

Break out #2: During the second break out session, students will learn to deal with crisis management, featuring presentations from the Ohio University Leadership Center and President of Regional Marketing Alliance of Northeast Ohio, Richard Batyko. 

Break out #3: The last break out session #PostGradPRoblems, students will hear from the Ohio University Career Services and industry professional, Demi Clark. 

A more detailed schedule can be found here: http://prssarcbeyond.com/speakers/speakers/

After absorbing an abundance of new knowledge, attendees will have the opportunity to network at the Opportunities Fair. Professionals from different companies and agencies will be there for students to connect with, many regarding prospective career or internship openings.

For updates and more information, visit the Beyond the Basics website: http://prssarcbeyond.com/

This is a once-in-a-college-career opportunity that is taking place right in our backyard.  If you haven’t registered, I strongly encourage you to do so today! The cost is $20 for PRSSA members, and $25 for non-PRSSA members.  Late registration fees will apply beginning after March 12.

Register here: http://prssarcbeyond.eventbrite.com/

National PRSSA Recognition

November 7, 2011

Over the last month, PRSSA National has recognized ImPRessions for reaching 200 members and creating a social media plan. Those recognitions are important not only because they received national attention, but also because they signify the accomplishments of our goals and of ImPRessions’ growth over the years.

The success of ImPRessions is not the work of a few; it the teamwork of many. First, the foundation and support of the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism has provided our firm with the guidance to reach for excellence. Without currently and previously driven ImPRessions and PRSSA executives and members, these accomplishments would have been impossible. We work closely with our Hugh M. Culbertson chapter of PRSSA, which has developed strong relationships and learning opportunities, especially with its executives and faculty adviser, Dan Farkas. With the help of the Amanda J. Cunningham Leadership Center at OHIO and student leadership manager, Scott Eardley, our members gained valuable managerial skills. And last but not least, our professional adviser, M.J. Clark, has given us invaluable direction. Her support raises our confidence to try new things and set new goals.

Improving upon successes is never easy, but is always necessary. With a strong executive board and these early accomplishments, ImPRessions has a strong foundation for the rest of the academic year and for years to come.

Scripps account utilizes social media to improve student communication

February 14, 2011 1 Comment

By Rebecca Reif                                                                                                                                                                 Associate, ImPRessions Account

The E.W. Scripps School of Journalism account presented to Scripps faculty at the 2010 Bush Seminar.

In an attempt to increase the number of applicants to the E. W. Scripps School of Journalism and to create more effective communication among current Scripps students, prospective students, and alumni, ImPRessions’ Scripps School of Journalism account has turned to social media for assistance.

The Scripps account wants to promote the idea that the E. W. Scripps School of Journalism is comprised of a lot more than just great professors and structured classes. Student-run organizations also make up a large part of the Scripps learning experience.

“I would say that after 5 p.m. Scripps is almost entirely run by students,” said Samantha Bartlett, Account Executive for ImPRessions’ E.W. Scripps School of Journalism account. This observation has helped the account come up with “Scripps After Dark,” a campaign that will highlight student-run organizations within the Scripps JSchool.

“I am astounded by the amount of energy and activity within the Scripps building after dark. The amount of students that are involved in different student-run organizations is really what makes our journalism school special,” said Dr. Robert Stewart, Director of the Scripps School of Journalism.

The Scripps After Dark campaign aims to utilize social media in order to publicize the efforts and accomplishments of different student-run organizations within Scripps.

“The social media phenomenon is really about sharing your experiences with others through the use of two-way communication. By utilizing Facebook to communicate with current and prospective students we are able to have a conversation- which is something that we can’t do with our website alone,” Stewart said.

Employing other forms of social media like Twitter, Wikipedia, and You Tube has also allowed the Scripps account to personalize relationships between students and the school itself.

Bartlett believes that the new campaign sheds positive light on the school. Bartlett said, “Having all of our social media run by students with the school’s approval shows that Scripps is stronger and more innovative than other schools in our field. We feel that our efforts show that Scripps is practicing what they preach to students– and that sends a powerful message.”

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